Brief

Promoting Information Sharing by Dual Eligible Special Needs Plans to Improve Care Transitions: State Options and Considerations

This brief examines the approaches used by three states – Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee – to develop and implement information-sharing processes for their Dual Eligible Special Needs Plans (D-SNPs) that support care transitions. The brief includes examples of contract language and strategies to encourage plan collaboration and problem solving around information sharing. It can help states, D-SNPs, and other stakeholders assess how to meet the new D-SNP contracting requirements and improve the care of dually eligible individuals.

State Approaches to Developing and Operating Ombudsman Programs for Demonstrations under the Financial Alignment Initiative

Ombudsman programs can offer beneficiary protections as part of Medicaid managed care programs. These programs are particularly important for beneficiaries with complex physical and behavioral health conditions, including many dually eligible individuals. For the demonstrations under the Financial Alignment Initiative, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS) and states incorporated ombudsman programs to help to resolve enrollees’ problems and alert Medicare-Medicaid Plans (MMPs), states, and CMS of emerging trends and issues.

An Exploration of Consumer Advisory Councils within Medicare-Medicaid Plans Participating in the Financial Alignment Initiative

The Center for Consumer Engagement in Health Innovation released a report The Biggest Value is Getting the Voice of the Member describing its findings on the composition, function, and impact of the Consumer Advisory Councils operating within Medicare-Medicaid Plans (MMPs) operating in capitated model demonstrations under the Financial Alignment Initiative. The report covers topics including, recruitment and training of consumer members, accommodations to help consumers participate, and ensuring representativeness and diversity.

Building a Stronger Foundation for Medicare- Medicaid Integration: Opportunities in Modifying State Administrative Processes

This brief describes several administrative changes that state Medicaid programs can make to: (1) support integration efforts; (2) improve beneficiaries’ experience of care; (3) decrease beneficiary out-of-pocket costs; and (4) reduce provider burden. Taking the steps described in this brief may help states build stronger, more effective integrated care programs and better position them to implement larger-scale integration efforts for their dually eligible populations.